Insider Tips

Things to Do in Skerries

By Visit DublinDublin's Official Tourism SiteBIO
Tweet us @visitdublinCLOSE

Leave the city behind and enjoy a short train journey along the scenic north Dublin estuary before beautiful Skerries comes into view. Life’s a beach in this picturesque seaside town, with islands, rich heritage, food and festivals all giving this coastal village enough vim and vigour to stand out as the perfect getaway.

Taken from the Irish Na Sceirí, meaning ‘The Rocks’, Skerries is a postcard-worthy haven with much to discover. Find out more about the best things to do in Skerries...


Things to Do in Skerries

Adventure awaits

Whether you live for a bracing hike or just enjoy a casual stroll with stunning views, Skerries has it all including seafront trails, woodland walks and garden jaunts. Every trail and path you follow in the area ultimately offers great views of the sea and surrounding nature. The two-and-a-half kilometre South Beach is a popular spot that leads to Shenick Island, on foot or by swimming if the tide is low and you fancy a dip.
 
Travel by kayak to the St. Patrick’s and Colt Islands situated between 0.5 and 1.5km off the north Dublin coast, and discover the vast amount of sea birds that populate these areas. The former of those islands is of course named in honour of the legendary St. Patrick, who in 432 AD quite literally left his mark on Skerries if the lore is to be believed. Indeed, his footprint on Red Island is said to be visible in the rocks to this very day…

Walk alongside landmark attractions steeped in character such as the windmills and watermills amidst the cornfields and wetlands at the Skerries Mills. Less than five minutes from the train station, the mills are a great first stop on your trip, with guided tours and a lovely café. These impressive structures stand tall as one of Ireland’s foremost industrial heritage centres, with stone-ground milling in Skerries dating back to the 16th century when the lands belonged to the Priory of Holmpatrick; an Augustinian monastic foundation.
 
Elsewhere, the grounds of the striking Ardgillan Castle form a regional park, featuring a five-mile network of walking trails through woodland, parkland and gardens. Here you will catch sight of the Mourne Mountains and Sliabh Foy; the highest peak atop the Cooley Mountains. For a regal treat, you can enjoy afternoon tea in the castle.

Things to do

Thrill-seekers can make their mark on the water with over half a dozen tried-and-tested kitesurfing spots dotted about the region. Sea tours, sailing clubs and water academies all operate in Skerries, offering a fun and safe way to make a splash. Skerries Sea Tours run two passenger trips daily; to Rockabil Lighthouse (one hour and 15 minutes) and Lambay Island (two hours) while the team at Outdoor Dublin will help you get to grips with stand up paddleboarding (SUP) and surfing.
 
On land, there are a number of live festivals celebrating music, arts, theatre, sport and comedy. Taking place in September, the Skerries Soundwaves Festival debuted in 2004 and has been delivering a rich mix of local, national and international culture ever since. Every November, Skerries Theatre Group host a One-Act Theatre Festival featuring innovative productions, while the Skerries 100 Road Races on the first weekend of July promise a white-knuckle thrill ride for spectators and the popular local golf club is an excellent course, no matter the skill level.

Things to Do in Skerries
Things to Do in Skerries

Places to eat and drink

As you might expect from a coastal town and once-thriving fishing port, Skerries’ connection to the nearby sea informs much of day-to-day life. When it comes to food, many restaurants serve up catch-of-the-day specials and delicious seafood dishes.
 
Strand Street plays host to buzzing cafés and restaurants from pizzerias to intimate tearooms and warm family restaurants that specialise in seafood, steak and Italian cuisine. Along the harbour, you’ll find hip haunts that mix authentic sea-faring atmosphere with incredible seafood such as locally caught prawns and crab claws. In town, you’ll find 12 traditional pubs, all home to a lively, traditional Irish atmosphere and steeped in the country’s charming culture.

Getting there

Skerries is easily accessible from Dublin city centre. Simply hop on the train from Connolly Station or take the bus. The 33 goes from Beresford Place while the 33X at Custom House Quay will also get you where you need to go.
 
All images credited to Lasma Kerve

Things to Do in Skerries